Topdownbrew.com: Contemporary English India Pale Ale (12c)

1. Enter the batch target values

original specific gravity (1.050 to 1.075)
% mash efficiency
volume (include wort losses)
US (gallons) Metric (liters)

2. Select the base malt

@ SG
@ SG
@ SG
@ SG

3. Enter the specialty malt percentages

Recommended specialty malts (0 to 10%):
% @ SG
% @ SG

Optional malts for biscuit or toasty character (5 to 10%):
% @ SG
% @ SG
% @ SG

Adjuncts (0 to 15%):
% @ SG
% @ SG
% @ SG

4. Enter the target IBUs and bittering hops

total IBUs (40 to 60 recommended)

Hop addition #1: minutes bittering hops boil time

@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%

5. Late hop additions

Recommendation: The late hop additions are typically 20% to 40% of the total IBUs.

number of late hop additions

6. Select the yeast pitching rate

Ale: 0.75 million cells per ml per degree plato
Strong ale: 1.0 million cells per ml per degree plato
Lager: 1.5 million cells per ml per degree plato

← Click here when the data entry is done.

Results: *** Waiting for results ***

Discussion:

British pale ale malts are recommended for the base malt. Crystal malts are used at a rate 0 to 10%, with 5% being recommended. Keeping the crystal malts at 10% or below is especially important if darker crystal malts are used. Munich, Victory, or biscuit malts are optional for increasing "complexity" or making American two-row base malts seem more like British pale ale malt. The mash is usually a single-step at temperatures of 150 to 155F.

British hops are important for authenticity. Some of these are low in alpha acids - 4 to 5% - by modern standards. A strategy to consider is using the higher alpha acid hops for bittering, and then finish with the lower alpha acid hops like Kent Goldings or Fuggle.

British yeasts that attenuate well are used to ensure that the final gravity does not end too high and result in a cloying beer. Zainasheff (2010) recommends White Labs London Ale (WLP013), Wyeast London Ale (1028), or Danstar Nottingham. Foster (2007) recommends White Labs Burton Ale (WLP023) or British Ale (WLP005), as well as Wyeast British Ale (1098) or London Ale (1028)

British IPAs from Burton were historically known for using high sulfate water (Foster, 2007). Copying the water profile of these historic beers may be unnecessary for modern malts and grain bills that include crystal malt. If desired, try adding gypsum at a rate of one teaspoon per five gallons.

References

Foster, T. (2007, May-June). UK India pale ale. BYO Magazine, 40 - 45.

Foster, T. (2015, September). Brewing British IPA

Steele, M. (2012). IPA: Brewing Techniques, Recipes, and the Evolution of India Pale Ale, Brewer's Publications, pages 223 to 225.

Zainasheff, J. (2010, November). English IPA: Big, British, and balanced. BYO Magazine, 19 - 22.


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