Topdownbrew.com: Cream Ale (1c)

1. Enter the batch target values

original specific gravity (1.042 to 1.055)
% mash efficiency
volume (include wort losses)
US (gallons) Metric (liters)

2. Select the base malt

@ SG
@ SG
@ SG
@ SG

3. Enter the specialty malt percentages

Base malts to blend with the above base malt (0 to 50%):
% @ SG
% @ SG

Adjunct grains (10 to 20%; 30% maximum):
% @ SG
% @ SG
% @ SG

Optional specialty grains:
% @ SG
% @ SG

Optional sugars for lighter body (5 to 20%; 10% recommended):
% @ SG
% @ SG

4. Enter the target IBUs and bittering hops

total IBUs (8 to 20 recommended)

Hop addition #1: minutes bittering hops boil time

@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%
@ AA%

5. Late hop additions

Recommendation: No late hops or one addition of 10% to 20% of overall IBUs.

number of late hop additions

6. Select the yeast type

Ale
Lager

← Click here when the data entry is done.

Results: *** Waiting for results ***

BJCP 2015 Description

"Overall Impression: A clean, well-attenuated, flavorful American "lawnmower" beer. Easily drinkable and refreshing, with more character than typical American lagers." BJCP, 2015, p. 1-2

Vital Statistics: OG: 1.042 – 1.055; IBUs: 8 – 20; FG: 1.006 – 1.012; SRM: 2.5 – 5 ABV: 4.2 – 5.6%

Notes

The historic grain bill for cream ales was six-row malt with 20 to 30% corn as an adjunct. More recent recipes blend about equal amounts of either pilsner malt, two-row, or six-row malt for 80% of the grain bill. The remaining 20% is corn or rice as an adjunct grain. Flaked corn or flaked rice are the easiest to use - just add to the mash. Corn grits should be gelatinized with a cereal mash procedure. Corn sugar, at about 10%, can also be used to create a light body. A single-stage mash around 148 to 150F (64 to 66C) is used in the reviewed recipes.

The historic hop used in cream ales was Cluster. Modern recipes use Liberty or similar American hops bred from the German Hallertau hop. A single hop addition for boiling at 60 minutes is sufficient. Most of the reviewed recipes had a small late aroma addition that was about 10 to 20% of the total IBUs. Use restraint to keep the late hop character subdued.

Most modern cream ale recipes call for American Ale yeast. A similar yeast with a relatively neutral character should also work. Historic examples sometimes used lager yeast or even a mix of ale and lager yeast. Dornbusch's recipe uses a blend of White Labs San Francisco Lager and Fermentis US-05. Another ale/lager blend possibility is the White Lab's cream ale yeast blend.

Sources

Colby, C. (2005, March-April). Cereal mash: Utilize an unmalted grain or starchy adjunct. BYO, 51-53.

Dornbusch, H.D. (2005, March-April). American cream ale: An American "retro" brew. BYO, 19-23.

Stika, J. (2017). Brewing with corn. BYO, 59-64.

Cream ale recipe (2012, September). BYO, 60.

Zainasheff, J. (2011, July-August). Cream ale: Crisp, light, and refreshing. BYO, 19-23.


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