Topdownbrew.com: Diastatic Power Calculator

Enter the malt pounds and diastatic power values

lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner
lbs of @ ° Lintner

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Optional: Transform Windisch-Kolbach to degrees Lintner

degrees Windisch Kolbach

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Discussion

The mashing process depends upon special proteins called enzymes. Their role is to convert long chains of sugar molecules (starches) into smaller sugars like glucose and maltose that can be readily consumed by the yeast. A successful mash needs a sufficient amount of enzymes to carry out the starch conversion process. Having enough enzymes is particularly critical for beers that have a high degree of adjunct grains and for mini-mash extract recipes.

Base malts have a high degree of enzymes, which is why base malts are typically 80% or more of the grain bill in most recipes. In contrast, darker malts tend to have little to no enzymes because the high temperatures during the kilning process destroys the enzymes. Likewise, most specialty malts (example: crystal malt) and adjunct grains (corn, rice, and unmalted wheat) have no enzymes.

Diastatic power (AKA enzymatic power) measures the amount of enzymes in specific grains or the mash. Most malting companies express diastatic power in degrees Lintner, although some European companies use a different scale called Windisch-Kolbach (WK). The goal is to have total mash value above 40 degrees Lintner.

The above calculator is based upon the formula and values provided by Hyde (2017). The default degrees Lintner values for the grains in this calculator are typical values (see Hyde, 2017; Figure 1), but these can vary greatly depending upon the maltster and the degree of kilning. More specific values can be found on data sheets provided by each malt company. For example, Briess product information includes DP values for their base malts . Brewunited.com has a comprehensive list of malts from many companies that includes the disastatic power values. Keep in mind that continental European malts may be based upon the WK scale, which will need to be changed to the equivalent degrees Lintner for the above calculator.

Reference

Hyde, A. (2017, October). Brewing by ratio. BYO Magazine, 44-50.

Kruger, T.L. (2016). Diastatic calculation formulae


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